Brain Storms

Subject: I am interested in how our thoughts and resulting emotions can make us suffer. Psychologists call this cognitive fusion: an inability to distance yourself from your thoughts. The opposite of cognitive fusion is succeeding in not taking the demons in your head too seriously, and is called cognitive defusion. I like what bhuddists say about this: 'You are the sky, but not the clouds' ... i.e. you can learn to let thoughts and feelings come and go like clouds across the sky of your mind.

Technique: To emphasize the difference between the real world and our thoughts about it, these works are a mixture: what is real is painted with oil over acrylic on panel or canvas, and the person's thoughts are drawn with permanent markers on transparent acrylic glass, mounted in front of the paintings.

  • Brainstorm, detail

    Brainstorm, detail

    Year
    2012
  • The crows of sorrow 2

    The crows of sorrow 2

    This dyptich is based on an old saying: 'You cannot prevent the crows of sorrow from circling your head, but you can stop them from building nests in your hair'.

    Year
    2012
  • The crows of sorrow 1

    The crows of sorrow 1

    This dyptich is based on an old saying: 'You cannot prevent the crows of sorrow from circling your head, but you can stop them from building nests in your hair'.

    Year
    2012
  • The crows of sorrow 2 (detail)

    The crows of sorrow 2 (detail)

  • The crows of sorrow 2 (detail)

    The crows of sorrow 2 (detail)

    march 18

  • Brain Storms, tryptich

    Brain Storms, tryptich

    Because of the combination of oil/panel and marker/acrylic glass very tricky to photograph - here's an overview of the three works standing in my studio.

    Year
    2013